Scholars Day poster presentations

"By participating in these types of events and activities, students receive great opportunities to interact with potential advisors and, if they are moving toward research work, potential collaborators."

Jeremy Newton
College of Arts & Sciences Professor of Psychology

Posters are a surprising and dynamic way for psychology students to present their work and collaborate with professionals in their field.

At first glance, a tri-folded piece of cardboard may not be the obvious choice to present topics such as “Holistic versus analytical attention: Impact of common environmental stimuli” or “Working Memory Capacity as a Moderator in the Processing of Intrusion.” However, Saint Martin’s students and faculty in the Department of Psychology have taken many-a-presentation on the road with just that: posters.

Saint Martin’s psychology students have presented posters at the Western Psychology Association Convention (WPA) in Nevada and the American Psychological Convention (APC) in Hawaii. These posters are invaluable tools, because they generate interest, give others a quick snapshot of the research students have been working on and often ignite dialogue. Furthermore, they give students, such as WPA presenters Timothy Templin and Katrine Tuengel, the opportunity to present their own ideas to potential colleagues and co-workers in their discipline.

Jeremy Newton, assistant professor of psychology, notes that posters may be the “first step towards a dynamic collaboration in the field.”

Such collaboration between faculty and students has already taken root at Saint Martin’s, where psychology student Ling-Jun Liu co-authored a poster presentation with Newton and went on to present it at the American Psychological Convention.

For future psychologists, posters encourage not only scholarship and collaboration, but also a sense of community. “When students are sitting in a classroom, they don’t have much of a chance to engage in interactions with people they might be working with in the future,” says Newton. “But by participating in these types of events and activities, student receive great opportunities to interact with potential advisors and, if they are moving toward research work, potential collaborators.”

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