Contact information

Office of the Registrar
Email: Registrar​@stmartin.edu
Phone: 360-438-4356
Fax: 360-438-4514


Admissions
Email:admissions​@stmartin.edu
Phone: 360-438-4596


Student Financial Services
Phone: 360-438-4389


Office of Graduate Studies
Email:gradstudies @stmartin.edu
Phone: 360-412-6142

Programs in science and mathematics

The science and mathematics programs of Saint Martin’s University will prepare students well for a career in any of our four major programs: biology, chemistry, computer science or mathematics. Limited coursework in physics is also offered. The division emphasizes critical analysis skills, logical problem solving, and collaborative work skills.

Biology

Faculty

Robert Bode
Aaron Coby
Samuel Fox
Mary Jo Hartman
Margaret Olney

Biology plays an important role in education and human life. The goal of the department of biology is to enable students to gain an understanding of the phenomena of living organisms. Courses are designed to demonstrate the natural interrelationships among living organisms and also between them and their environments. Students will be prepared for more specialized investigations.

General Biology Programs

The Department of Biology offers courses that prepare students for careers in teaching, research, government and industry, and for entry into graduate and professional schools. Areas of concentration include environmental science, marine biology, microbiology, molecular biology, human biology and botany. Opportunities for internships are available in these and many other areas. Under the direction of its faculty, the department also offers students the opportunity to pursue research.

Pre-health Programs

Saint Martin’s University has a long and successful history of placing students into professional programs. Saint Martin’s offers pre-health instruction that prepares students for admission into professional healthcare graduate schools including medical schools, osteopathic medical schools, dental schools, physical therapy schools, pharmacy schools and chiropractic colleges. The necessary preparatory pre-health curriculum varies from one field of study to another and from one graduate school to another. Programs usually include:

  • Completion of a four-year undergraduate degree.
  • Completion of a standardized preadmission examination, usually taken during a student’s junior year. (The exam required depends on the intended field of graduate study.)
  • Completion of relevant undergraduate pre-health classes, typically including:
    • Two semesters of general biology.
    • Two semesters of inorganic chemistry. Several upper-division biology electives.
    • Two semesters of introductory physics.
    • One or two semesters of organic chemistry.
    • Two or more semesters of mathematics. Some schools require additional coursework in biochemistry, calculus and the social sciences.

Clinical work during a student’s undergraduate career is often preferred — and sometimes required — prior to acceptance into a professional healthcare school. These experiences are available through the department of biology’s internship program.

Students enrolled in pre-health programs will be assigned a pre-health advisor. The advisor will design and individualize the coursework that best fits individual needs and goals. Pre-health advising is given through the biology department at Saint Martin’s. However, pre-health students may select any major field of study in pursuit of their degree, assuming that the relevant pre-health requirements are met as outlined above.

Bachelor of Science

General Education Core (40 semester hours)

Major in Biology

Lower-Division Courses (39 semester hours)

  • BIO 141 General Biology I with Laboratory and BIO 142 General Biology II with Laboratory
  • CHM 141/142 General Chemistry with Laboratory
  • Two mathematics courses
  • PHY 141/142 General Physics with Laboratory
  • CHM 201 Organic Chemistry I with Laboratory or equivalent

Upper-Division Courses (30 semester hours)

  • BIO 400 Senior Seminar (2 semester hours)
  • BIO 401 Senior Seminar Research (4 semester hours)

24 semester hours, including at least one course from each of the following three categories:

Molecular/cellular biology:

  • BIO 352 Advanced Microbiology,
  • BIO 370 Cell Biology, or
  • BIO 375 Genetics with Laboratory.

Organismal biology:

  • BIO 305 Botany with Laboratory,
  • BIO 314 Invertebrate Zoology with Laboratory,
  • BIO 328 Anatomy and Physiology I,
  • BIO 351 Microbiology with Laboratory, or
  • BIO 382 Vertebrate Embryology.

Ecology:

  • BIO 310 Marine Biology with Laboratory,
  • BIO 350 Microbial Ecology,
  • BIO 358 Ecology,
  • BIO 359 Field Ecology
  • Remaining semester hours chosen from: BIO 305 Botany with Laboratory; 310 Marine Biology with Laboratory; BIO 314 Invertebrate Zoology with Laboratory; BIO 328 Human Anatomy and Physiology I; BIO 329 Human Anatomy and Physiology II; BIO 330 Advanced Anatomy and Physiology, Bio350 Microbial Ecology; BIO 351 Microbiology with Laboratory; Bio352 Advanced Microbiology; 358 Ecology; BIO 359 Field Ecology; 360 Advanced Ecology; BIO 370 Cell Biology; BIO 382 Vertebrate Embryology; BIO 390 Internship; BIO 395 Special Topics; BIO 397 Directed Study; BIO 399 Bio-logical Research and Data Presentation; CHM 362 Biochemistry

The following courses are recommended for students planning to pursue graduate studies in biology:

  • MTH 171 Calculus I and MTH 172 Calculus II
  • CHM 362 Biochemistry
  • MTH 201 Introduction to Statistics
  • CHM 202/202L Organic Chemistry II/Laboratory

Minor in Biology

This program is a 22-semester-hour course of study for students interested in the biological sciences but do not plan to major in biology. The biology minor consists of the following:

Lower-Division Courses (8 semester hours)

  • BIO 141 General Biology I with Laboratory
  • BIO 142 General Biology II with Laboratory

Upper-Division Courses (14 semester hours)

  • BIO 375 Genetics with Laboratory
  • 10 additional semester hours in biology courses numbered 300 or above, excluding BIO 390, BIO 401, BIO 402

Upper-division elective classes include the following:

  • BIO 305 Botany with Laboratory
  • BIO 310 Marine Biology with Laboratory
  • BIO 314 Invertebrate Zoology with Laboratory
  • BIO 326 Anatomy/Physiology I
  • BIO 329 Anatomy/Physiology II
  • BIO 350 Microbial Ecology
  • BIO 351 Microbiology with Laboratory
  • BIO 352 Advanced Microbiology
  • BIO 358 Ecology
  • BIO 359 Field Ecology
  • BIO 360 Advanced Ecology
  • BIO 370 Cell Biology
  • BIO 382 Vertebrate Embryology
  • BIO 395 Special Topics
  • BIO 397 Directed Study
  • BIO 399 Research

Revised Washington State Education Endorsements

For information on the Washington State teacher education endorsement in biology, please refer to the requirements as outlined in the education section of the Academic Catalog.

Chemistry

Faculty

Darrell Axtell
Gregory Milligan
Arwyn Smalley
David Tempel

Society is influenced by the field of chemistry in essentially all phases of life. An understanding of chemistry is necessary for those who wish to study such subjects as biology, physiology, psychology, geology, environmental science, engineering, law, medicine and dentistry.

A knowledge of chemistry and its effects, as related to the foods we eat, the air we breathe and medications we use, for example, will enhance the lives of students from all disciplines.

All courses contain a strong emphasis on classroom instruction and development of competent laboratory technique. In advanced courses, hands-on training in operation and use of all department instruments is received.

Saint Martin’s offers both a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry.

The curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in chemistry serves the needs of those seeking a broader education. Many students opt for the bachelor of arts program and complete the requirements for a second degree with a major in biology while in the University’s pre-medicine program. This curriculum is recommended for students entering the allied health fields and for those who desire to teach science at the secondary school level. Students working toward a Bachelor of Arts degree are expected to complete both Elements of Research (CHM 375) and Thesis (CHM 475), and either Research (CHM 450) or an internship (CHM 390).

The curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry is designed to prepare students for positions in industry and government or for further graduate education. Degree requirements are based on American Chemical Society standards. Students working toward a Bachelor of Science degree will complete Elements of Research, Research, and Thesis (CHM 375, 450, and 475).

An internship program is available to all chemistry majors, although it is not a requirement for Bachelor of Science candidates. All chemistry majors are advised to take ENG 306, Professional and Academic Writing Skills, as an elective.

Prerequisites for all chemistry courses must be passed with a grade of "C-" or better.

Bachelor of Arts

General Education Core (40-46 semester hours)

Major in Chemistry (64-70 semester hours)

Lower-Division Courses (20 semester hours of chemistry; 10 of physics; 8 of mathematics, as specified)

  • CHM 141/141L, 142/142L General Chemistry/Laboratory
  • CHM 201/201L Organic Chemistry I/Laboratory
  • CHM 202/202L Organic Chemistry II/Laboratory
  • PHY 141/141L General Physics/Laboratory
  • PHY 142/142L General Physics/Laboratory
  • MTH 171, 172 Calculus I, II

Upper-Division Courses (26-32 semester hours, as specified)

  • CHM 331/331L Quantitative Analysis/Laboratory
  • CHM 345/345L Molecular Structure Analysis/Laboratory
  • CHM 362/362L Biochemistry/Laboratory
  • CHM 371/371L Physical Chemistry/Laboratory
  • CHM 372/372L Physical Chemistry/Laboratory
  • CHM 375 Elements of Research
  • CHM 390 Student Internship or CHM 450 Research
  • CHM 475 Thesis

Bachelor of Science

General Education Core (40 semester hours)

Major in Chemistry (68-69 semester hours)

Lower-Division Courses (20 semester hours of chemistry; 10 of physics; 8 of mathematics, as specified)

  • CHM 141/141L, 142/142L General Chemistry/Laboratory
  • CHM 201/201L Organic Chemistry I/Laboratory
  • CHM 202/202L Organic Chemistry II/Laboratory
  • PHY 171/171L Introductory Physics/Laboratory
  • PHY 172/172L Introductory Physics/Laboratory
  • MTH 171, 172 Calculus I, II

Upper-Division Courses (30-31 hours in chemistry, as specified below)

  • CHM 331/33L Quantitative Analysis/Laboratory
  • CHM 345/345L Molecular Structure Analysis
  • CHM 355 Inorganic Chemistry
  • CHM 371/371L, 372/372L Physical Chemistry/Laboratory
  • CHM 375 Elements of Research
  • CHM 450 Research
  • CHM 475 Thesis
  • Plus at least one of the following: CHM 351 Organic Chemistry III; CHM 362/362L Biochemistry/Laboratory; CHM 395 Special Topics; MTH 322 Differential Equations

Minor in Chemistry (30 semester hours, as specified below)

Lower-Division Courses

  • CHM 141/141L, 142/142L General Chemistry/Laboratory
  • CHM 201/201L Organic Chemistry I/Laboratory
  • CHM 202/202L Organic Chemistry II/Laboratory

Upper-Division Courses

  • CHM 331/331L Quantitative Analysis/Laboratory
  • Six semester hours in chemistry courses numbered 300 or above, exclusive of CHM 375, CHM 390, CHM 450, CHM 475 (only one credit of CHM 380 and one of CHM 385 may be applied toward the chemistry minor)

Revised Washington State Education Endorsements

For information on the Washington State teacher education endorsement in chemistry, please refer to the requirements as outlined in the education section of the Academic Catalog.

Computer science

Faculty

Kyu Lee

The Bachelor of Science degree program in computer science provides students with the education and training needed for careers in software development, testing, systems analysis and database applications development. The program also provides a solid base for those graduates who plan to seek an advanced degree in the field. In the midst of a rich liberal arts curriculum, the computer science program is designed to meet the needs of industry. As such, it continuously reshapes itself with the advancement of information technology. Areas of focus include software engineering, software testing, e-commerce and C# programming. The program offers a firm foundation in the fundamentals of computer science plus a balanced treatment of the key topics mentioned above.

The program provides:

  • A rigorous educational environment in which faculty members work closely with their students.
  • Quality computer facilities.
  • Small classes, enabling students to receive individual attention from faculty members.
  • Necessary class, library, computer and study environments to support the program.
  • A strong liberal arts component that broadens career options and the possibility of professional advancement.

The in-class portion of the program is supplemented by hands-on experience in the University’s computer labs and an optional internship. All students are required in his or her senior year to apply what they have learned by creating a significant software product under the supervision of a computer science faculty member.

Students must receive a minimum grade of “C-” in all degree requirements listed below to graduate with a computer science major or minor.

Bachelor of Science

General Education Core (40 semester hours)

Major in Computer Science (56 semester hours, as specified)

Lower-Division Courses

  • CSC 180 Introduction to Programming with C#
  • CSC 200 Intermediate Programming
  • CSC 220 Computer Organization and Assembly Language
  • MTH 171 Calculus I
  • MTH 172 Calculus II
  • MTH 220 Discrete Mathematics

Upper-Division Courses

  • CSC 310 An Introduction to Database Design
  • CSC 340 Data Structures and Algorithms
  • CSC 345 Data Communications and Networking
  • CSC 370 Principles of Programming Languages
  • CSC 385 Operating System Theory
  • CSC 430 Introduction to Computer Theory
  • CSC 446 Software Engineering: Analysis and Design
  • CSC 450 Software Testing - or -
    CSC 460 E-Commerce Development
  • CSC 480 Senior Project
  • MTH 353 Linear Algebra
  • MTH 357 Probability and Statistics
  • BA 305 Business Communication

Minor in Computer Science (21 semester credits, as specified)

  • CSC 160 Introduction to Computing Technology
  • CSC 180 Introduction to Programming with C#
  • CSC 200 Intermediate Programming
  • CSC 220 Computer Organization and Assembly Language
  • CSC 310 An Introduction to Database Design
  • CSC 340 Data Structures and Algorithms
  • CSC elective (three upper-division semester hours credit)

Mathematics

Faculty

Bonnie Amende
Joe Mailhot
Carol Overdeep
Katherine Porter

Mathematics contributes in a unique way to the development of the disciplined, rational person. It improves one’s ability to fit new concepts into a framework of existing knowledge. Students graduating with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics frequently find employment in secondary schools, insurance firms, and the financial or computing divisions of large companies.

The mathematics program at Saint Martin’s University provides a basic undergraduate program for mathematics majors, supports other majors in the University and offers courses of general interest.

The Mathematics Department requires students who have no record of successful completion (grade of “C-” or better) of a necessary prerequisite to take the Mathematics Placement Exam. The Mathematics Placement Exam will identify the course number(s) of the introductory math course(s) for which the student is best prepared.

A recommendation of a course by the Mathematics Placement Exam will be considered “an equivalent math placement exam score” in determining prerequisites. Note, however, that a student cannot earn academic credit through the results of the Mathematics Placement Exam.

Students must receive a minimum grade of “C-” in all degree requirements listed below, with the GPA for these courses no lower than 2.33, to graduate with a mathematics degree or minor.

Bachelor of Science

General Education Core (40 semester hours)

Major in Mathematics

Lower-Division Courses (29-35 semester hours)

  • One computer science course other than CSC 160, of at least three semester hours
  • MTH 171 Calculus I
  • MTH 172 Calculus II
  • MTH 220 Discrete Mathematics
  • MTH 271 Vector Calculus
  • Any two sequences chosen from:
    • PHY 171/172 Introductory Physics
    • CHM 141/142 General Chemistry
    • BIO 141/142 General Biology
    • CSC 180/200 Programming with C#
    • ECN 101 Principles of Economics - and - one of: ECN 325 The Evolution of Economic Thought; ECN 371 Econometrics; or BA 302 Applied Quantitative Management Techniques

NOTE: CSC courses cannot be counted to satisfy the “one computer science course” requirement above when taken to satisfy the “two-sequence” requirement.

NOTE: These courses do not count toward the upper-division major requirements when taken to satisfy lower-division requirements.

Upper-Division Courses (34-35 semester hours)

  • MTH 353 Linear Algebra
  • MTH 357 Probability and Statistics
  • MTH 461 Abstract Algebra
  • MTH 471 Real Analysis I
  • MTH 400 Senior Paper
  • Three upper-division math electives, each of at least three semester hours
  • Nine approved upper-division semester hours in a supportive area such as biology, chemistry, computer science, economics, education, engineering, or physics

NOTE: The upper-division support area courses must be in the same area.

Bachelor of Arts

General Education Core (40-46 semester hours)

Mathematics Major

Lower-Division Courses (17 semester credits)

  • One computer science course, of at least three semester hours
  • MTH 171 Calculus I
  • MTH 172 Calculus II
  • MTH 220 Discrete Mathematics
  • MTH 271 Vector Calculus

Upper-Division Courses (28-29 semester hours)

  • Three of the following four courses:
  • MTH 353 Linear Algebra
  • MTH 357 Probability and Statistics
  • MTH 461 Abstract Algebra
  • MTH 471 Real Analysis I
  • Three upper-division math electives, each of at least three semester hours
  • Nine approved upper-division semester hours in a supportive area such as biology, chemistry, computer science, economics, education, engineering, or physics.

NOTE: The upper-division support area courses must be in the same area.

To be recommended by the Department of Mathematics for teaching at the secondary level, a student must fulfill requirements for a bachelor of arts degree as outlined, including MTH 366 Geometry, and the requirements of Education Programs.

Minor in Mathematics (23-25 semester hours)

Lower-Division Courses

  • MTH 171 Calculus I
  • MTH 172 Calculus II
  • MTH 220 Discrete Mathematics -or-
    MTH 271 Vector Calculus

Upper-Division Courses

  • Four upper-division math electives, each of at least three semester hours

Revised Washington State Education Endorsements

For information on the Washington State teacher education endorsement in mathematics, please refer to the requirements as outlined in the education section of the Academic Catalog.

Physics

Faculty

Gordon Bellevue
Stephen Parker
John Weiss

Physics seeks to explain the workings of the physical world encompassing a vast scale from elementary particles to the cosmos. Physics interacts with fields such as chemistry, biology, astronomy and engineering to provide a background for study in these areas.

There are currently no major or minor programs available in physics.

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