Contact information

Office of the Registrar
Email: Registrar​@stmartin.edu
Phone: 360-438-4356
Fax: 360-438-4514


Admissions
Email:admissions​@stmartin.edu
Phone: 360-438-4596


Student Financial Services
Phone: 360-438-4389


Office of Graduate Studies
Email:gradstudies @stmartin.edu
Phone: 360-412-6142

Programs in social sciences

The social sciences are concerned with the development of human society, the nature of social institutions and roles, human behavior and the ideas that have shaped human life. At Saint Martin’s University, the social sciences are represented by majors in community services, criminal justice, history, political science, psychology, social studies and sociology and cultural anthropology. Minors are available in criminal justice, history, political science, international relations, psychology, social studies, sociology and cultural anthropology and women’s studies. Limited coursework in geography is also offered within the social science programs.

Geography

Faculty

Richard Langill

There are currently no major or minor programs available in geography.

History

Faculty

Brian Barnes
Rex J. Casillas
Aaron Goings
Father Gerard Kirsch, O.S.B.
Richard Langill
Roger Snider

History is the critical examination of peoples, places, and cultures in the past, across the globe. The Department of History devotes itself to teaching within the tradition of liberal arts and professional education to produce responsible and informed persons. Our graduates will attain a solid base of historical knowledge, and of global historical development. They will understand how to think critically and how to communicate, in both written and oral forms, lessons and insights from the past. Our students will use their knowledge and skills to reach outside the university in service to the larger community. Our department seeks to educate future leaders to be thoughtful, informed, and objective participants in the global society.

To fulfill this mission, the department’s curriculum is designed to achieve the following objectives:

  • To acquaint the students with major issues in world history.
  • To assist the student in developing the skills for critical thinking.
  • To teach the student how to conduct independent research and critically evaluate sources.
  • To develop the student’s oral and written communication.
  • To prepare students who seek to enter the profession of history.
  • To teach students the diversity of human experience within and across nations and cultures.

Bachelor of Arts

General Education Core (40-46 semester hours)

Major in History (36 semester hours)

Upper Division Courses (27 upper-division semester hours in history)

  • European Emphasis: History majors with a European emphasis must take nine upper-division semester hours in European History, including HIS 344 and HIS 347 and:
    • Three semester hours in American history
    • Three semester hours in history of non-Western cultures
    • Nine semester hours in political science, six of which must be upper-division work
    • HIS 498 Research Methods
    • HIS 499 Senior Seminar/Paper
  • United States Emphasis: History majors with a United States emphasis must take nine upper-division semester hours in U.S. history, including six from HIS 356, HIS 357, HIS 358, HIS 359, and:
    • Three semester hours in European history
    • Three semester hours in history of non-Western cultures
    • Nine semester hours in political science, six of which must be upper-division work
    • HIS 498 Research Methods
    • HIS 499 Senior Seminar/Paper
  • Non-Western Emphasis: History majors with a non-Western emphasis must take nine semester hours of their choice from HIS 410, HIS 411, HIS 413, HIS 415, and:
    • Three semester hours in European history
    • Three semester hours in U.S. history
    • Nine semester hours in political science, six of which must be upper-division work
    • HIS 498 Research Methods
    • HIS 499 Senior Seminar/Paper

No more than six semester hours of internship credit may be applied toward requirements for a history major.

The following departmental courses may be applied to either (but not both) the history or political science degree requirements: American Foreign Policy, American Constitutional Development, Political Ideologies, History of Capitalism, History of the Vietnam War, and the Cold War.

History majors are advised to pursue supporting coursework in foreign languages, statistics, computer science and philosophy.

Minor in History (18 semester hours)

Lower-Division Courses

Lower division supportive coursework including:

  • American Emphasis: HIS 141 U.S. History to 1877 -or- HIS 142 U.S. History Since 1877 -or- equivalents
  • European Emphasis: 101 Development of Western Civilization –or- HIS 102 Survey of Modern Europe Since 1648 -or- equivalents

Upper-Division Courses

12 upper-division semester hours in history, including:

  • Either HIS 344 Nineteenth Century European history -or- HIS 347 Twentieth Century Europe
  • Either HIS 356 Colonial American History to 1763 -or- HIS 357 United States History 1763-1877 -or- HIS 358 United States History 1877-1945 -or- HIS 359 United States History Since 1945
  • Six upper-division semester hours in political science

Revised Washington State Education Endorsements

For information on the Washington State teacher education endorsement in history, please refer to the requirements as outlined in the education section of the Academic Catalog.

Political science

Political scientists seek to understand the basis of power in society, how that power is organized and exercised and its impact on people’s lives.

Objectives of the major are to:

  • Acquaint the student with the great issues of politics.
  • Analyze alternative approaches to those issues.
  • Develop the student’s intelligent and lasting interest in society and politics and provide him or her with an environment for learning active self-governance.
  • Serve practical needs of students planning a career involving the law, processes, institutions, techniques and social and economic environment of modern governments (areas stressed are law, public administration, the foreign service, journalism and business).
  • Prepare students for graduate study with a view toward teaching and/or research.

Political and social ideas, movements and institutions are incomprehensible without adequate understanding of their history. Likewise, the study of history profits from awareness of political and social philosophies, institutions and concerns.

The major provides students with a mature understanding of politics and history. The department offers coursework in a program integrating history and political science. While students can elect either a history or political science degree, substantial coursework is required in both disciplines for departmental majors.

Bachelor of Arts

General Education Core (40-46 semester hours)

Major in Political Science (36 semester hours)

Upper-Division Courses

  • 27 upper-division semester hours in political science, including:
  • PLS 300 International Relations; PLS 350 Government and Politics of Europe or PLS 352 Government Politics of Asia; PLS 385 Political Ideologies: Their Origin and Impact; PLS 498 Research Methods in History and Political Science; PLS 499 Senior Seminar Paper
  • One course chosen from: PLS 364 Political Behavior and Public Opinion; LS 366 Congress and the Presidency; PLS 381 Political Parties
  • 9 semester hours of history, all of which must be upper-division

NOTE: No more than six semester hours of credit in internships may be applied toward requirements for a political science major.

The following departmental courses may be applied to either (but not both) the political science or the history degree requirements: American Foreign Policy, American Constitutional Development, Political Ideologies, History of the Vietnam War, History of Capitalism, and the Cold War.

Political science majors are advised to pursue supporting coursework in philosophy, research methods, statistics and computer studies.

Minor in Political Science (21 semester hours)

Upper-Division Courses

  • 12 upper-division semester hours in political science including:
  • PLS 300 International Relations; PLS 350 Government and Politics of Europe; or PLS 352 Government Politics of Asia.
  • One course chosen from: PLS 364 Political Behavior and Public Opinion; PLS 366 The Legislative Process; PLS 381 Political Parties;
  • PLS 385 Political Ideologies: Their Origin and Impact.
  • Six upper-division semester hours in history

Minor in International Relations (21 semester hours)

The minor in international relations seeks to provide students with an understanding of the political economic, social and cultural relations between nations. The minor requires coursework in political science, international relations, geography, history and languages, with additional electives in related fields, such as comparative politics, economics, sociology and cultural anthropology.

The minor recognizes the fact that we live in an interdependent world where globalization has had a tremendous impact on foreign and domestic policy. The minor may be of special interest to students majoring in business, the social sciences or humanities and who want an international dimension to their education.

Requirements:

  • Nine semester hours consisting of: GPH 210 World Regional Geography; PLS 300 International Relations; PLS/HIS 310 American Foreign Policy or PLS/HIS 330 Cold War.
  • One course (three semester hours) chosen from: HIS 211 History of Latin American Civilization; HIS 213 History of African Civilization to 1880; HIS 215 History of Islamic Civilization; HIS 217 History of Chinese and Japanese Civilization.
  • Six semester hours or its equivalent chosen from: SPN 201/202 Intermediate Spanish; FRN 201/202 Intermediate French; JPN 201/202 Intermediate Japanese.
  • One elective (three semester hours) chosen from: ECN 420 International Business; PLS 152 U.S. and World Affairs; PLS 325 History of the Vietnam War; PLS 350 European Politics; PLS 352 Asian Politics; SOC 103 Cultural Anthropology; SOC 396 Intercultural Communication.
  • Credit through the Defense Language Institute at the intermediate proficiency level may be used to fulfill this requirement.

Psychology

Faculty

Tiffany Artime
Michael Butler
Jeremy Newton
Sheila Steiner
Thomas Woodruff

The Department of Psychology has three interrelated objectives:

  • To provide students with knowledge through classroom work and field experience that will prepare them for entry-level positions in human services professions.
  • To provide students with opportunities to examine and interpret human lives and relationships through psychological perspectives.
  • To help prepare interested students for graduate study in psychology and related fields. The department structures coursework and field placements to integrate experiential learning with rigorous study of psychology as the scientific study of human beings. The department’s curriculum does not emphasize any single school of thought. Instead, it provides a broad-based education in psychology that gives students completing the program the skills and self-confidence to use a variety of perspectives in their work with people.

Bachelor of Arts

General Education Core (40-46 semester hours)

Major in Psychology (42 semester hours)

Lower-Division Courses

  • MTH 201 Introduction to Statistics
  • PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
  • PSY 205 Child and Adolescent Development
    - or - PSY 215 Lifespan Development
  • PSY 240 Research Methods

Upper-Division Courses (30 semester hours)

  • PSY 320 Social Psychology
  • PSY 335 Abnormal Psychology
  • PSY 390 Psychology Internship
    -or- PSY 394: Psychology Research Internship I
  • PSY 420 Personality Theories
  • PSY 430 Learning, Cognition, and Behavior
  • PSY 499 Senior Seminar
  • 12 additional upper division electives in psychology

Minor in Psychology (21 semester hours)

Lower-Division Courses (6 semester hours)

  • PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
  • PSY 240 Research Methods

Upper-Division Courses (15 semester hours)

  • PSY 320 Social Psychology
  • PSY 335 Abnormal Psychology
  • PSY 420 Personality Theories
  • 2 additional upper-division elective courses in psychology

Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology

For more detailed information regarding graduate programs at Saint Martin’s, please see the Graduate Academic Catalog.

Women's studies

Faculty

Olivia Archibald
Rex J. Casillas
David Price
Katya Shkurkin
Roger Snider

Women’s Studies offers a comprehensive program that provides students with a multidisciplinary body of theoretical and factual knowledge about women.

The minor gives students information about women’s experiences, history and changing roles, thus offering a valuable background for most professions and an important complement to any major. Coursework includes scholarship by and/or about women in literature, the arts, history, science, politics and other relevant fields of study. It also analyzes the experiences of women with respect to social, psychological, cultural and biological factors, and the construction and representation of gender.

Minor in Women’s Studies (18 semester hours)

Required Courses (six semester hours)

  • WS 200 Introduction to Women’s Studies
  • WS 400 Feminist Theory and Practice

Electives (12 semester hours chosen from the following)

  • BIO 395 Women and Science
  • ENG 381 Women’s Literature
  • ENG 312 Literature Criticism
  • HIS 305 History of American Women
  • HIS 315 Women’s Sports History
  • PLS 360 Women in Politics
  • PSY 310 Human Sexuality
  • PSY 385 Psychology of Women
  • PSY 387 Body Image and Eating Disorders
  • SOC 333 Women, Culture and Society
  • WS 295/395/495 Special Topics
  • WS 316 History of Women in North American Social Work
  • WS 397 Directed Studies

Society and Social Justice

The Department of Society and Social Justice is an administrative unit that incorporates the intellectual orientations and curricula of several distinct but complementary programs. It offers the Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication Studies, Community Services, Criminal Justice, Sociology and Cultural Anthropology, and the Bachelor of Social Work as well as minor concentrations in all of those disciplines but Social Work, as well as in Legal Studies and Social Justice. The department is also home to the University’s pre-law program. Detailed information about the curricula and course offerings for these programs can be found in their respective sections of this catalog.

Communication studies

Faculty

Irina Gendelman

Communication Studies is an interdisciplinary program that uses critical and cultural studies to understand the central role of communication in society, with a focus on social justice. This program provides a broad overview of the different areas of communication, including the historical, institutional and social contexts of mass media and communication technologies; communication laws and ethics; rhetorical and semiotic analysis; as well as self-reflective citizen engagement and the creation of communication media (written, oral and visual). Communication Studies prepares students for careers in a wide range of fields, from public relations and advertising to media arts production to work in the public sector and more. Students also may continue to further their studies in graduate school, specializing in the humanities, social sciences, public relations, digital media or filmmaking. This major offers the opportunity to pursue a production-focused or more theoretically oriented course of study and it is designed to provide a well-rounded understanding of the field of communication.

Bachelor of Arts

General Education Core (40-46 semester hours)

Communication Studies Major (39 semester hours)

Lower-Division Courses

  • COM 110 Introduction to Communication
  • COM 201 Communication and Identity
  • SOC 240 Research Methods

Upper-Division Courses

  • COM 320 Media and Culture
  • COM 390 Internship
  • COM 499 Capstone Project

21 additional credits required from the list of approved electives, 18 of which must be upper division.

Minor in Communication Studies (21 semester hours)

Lower-Division Courses

  • COM 110 Introduction to Communication
  • SOC 240 Research Methods

Upper-Division Courses (12 required semester hours of approved courses in communication and electives, including:)

  • COM 320 Media and Culture

Approved Elective Courses

Students may take an elective that is not listed below if, in the judgment of the program director, it will significantly enhance their learning experience in the major.

  • COM 300 Media Production
  • COM 360 Communication Law and Policy
  • COM 380 Copy Editing and Design
  • COM 385 Conflict and Peace Studies
  • COM 395 Special Topics
  • COM 397 Directed Study
  • COM 398 Media History
  • COM 399 Communication Theory
  • COM 401 Community Media Lab
  • COM 299/WRT 299 Introduction to Journalism
  • COM 302/WRT 302 Advanced Journalism
  • COM 303/WRT 303 Digital Journalism
  • COM 307/THR 307 Studies in Film
  • COM 317/ENG 317 Language and Culture
  • MUS 110 Applied Lessons
  • PHL 301 Ethics
  • PSY 320 Social Psychology
  • SJ 370/ SOC 370 Social Action
  • SOC 450 Advanced Research Methods
  • SPH 103 Interpersonal Communication
  • SPH 106 Public Address
  • THR 302 Playwriting
  • THR 402 Playwriting
  • WRT 306 Professional and Academic Writing

Community services

Faculty

Tam Dinh
Katya Shkurkin

The community services program is an interdisciplinary social work major that combines classroom study with practical application through extensive internship.

Objectives are to:

  • Increase student knowledge of the social work approach to solving human problems.
  • Help students gain intellectual skills, moral insight and humanistic concepts.
  • Encourage students to develop ethical and analytical thinking essential for professional life in social work, psychology, foreign service and a variety of other human service professions.
  • Prepare students desiring professional work as a human service practitioner. The community services major is offered only at the University’s Lacey campus.

Bachelor of Arts

General Education Core (40-46 semester hours)

Community Services Major (51 semester hours)

Lower-Division Courses

  • SOC 210 Introduction to Social Work
  • SOC 240 Research Methods
  • One lower-division course in economics
  • One lower-division course in history or political science
  • One lower-division course in psychology

Upper-Division Courses

  • One upper-division course in economics
  • One upper-division course in history or political science
  • SOC 344 Case Management and Advanced Interviewing
  • PSY 340 Interviewing (a prerequisite for SOC 344)
  • Three additional upper-division courses concentrating in one field, chosen from psychology, sociology, political science, history or economics
  • 12-27 semester hours of internship
  • Senior seminar. Student selects a senior seminar from a Social Science discipline. Consult with your academic advisor.

Before enrolling in an internship (CSP 390), students must meet the following requirements:

  • Completion of 12 semester hours of required major courses on the Lacey campus.
  • Completion of SOC 344: Case Management and Advanced Interviewing, with a grade of “B” or better.
  • Have an overall grade point average of at least 2.5.

Criminal justice

Faculty

Robert Hauhart
Victor Kogan

The criminal justice major is an interdisciplinary social science program preparing candidates for positions in the criminal justice field and providing a solid background for further education in graduate school or law school. A major in criminal justice may be complemented by minors in sociology, psychology or political science.

Bachelor of Arts

General Education Core (40-46 semester hours)

Major in Criminal Justice (39 semester hours)

Lower-Division Courses (12-15 semester hours in criminal justice, including:)

  • CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • CJ 215 Police and Society
  • SOC/PSY 240 Research Methods
  • PLS 150 Survey of American Government and Politics

Upper-Division Courses (24-27 upper-division semester hours in criminal justice, including: )

  • CJ 308 Impact of Correctional Methods
  • CJ/SOC 325 Criminology and Juvenile Delinquency
  • CJ/PLS 379 Judicial Process
  • CJ/PLS 430 Constitutional Safeguards and Individual Liberties
  • CJ 410 Law and Society
  • CJ 499 Senior Seminar

Minor in Criminal Justice (21 semester hours, including CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice)

Legal studies

Faculty

Robert Hauhart
Victor Kogan
Roger Snider

The Legal Studies concentration is an interdisciplinary field of study composed of law courses from the departments of Criminal Justice, Political Science, History, Sociology, Philosophy, and the schools of Business, Education, and Engineering. Legal Studies is administered under the direction of the pre-law advisor and the Department of Criminal Justice. Students interested in acquainting themselves with the genesis, development, impact and contemporary status of American law may minor in Legal Studies in support of their major field of study. Students interested in pursuing law school and a career in law are especially encouraged to fulfill a minor concentration in Legal Studies.

Minor in Legal Studies

A student may complete a minor concentration in Legal Studies by completing 21 semester hours in approved law related courses. Nine hours of required legal studies courses may be supplemented by 12 hours of electives from the courses listed below.

Required Courses (9 semester hours)

A student electing to pursue a minor in Legal Studies must complete:

  • LS 101 The Legal Environment and Ethics
  • CJ/PLS 430 Constitutional Safeguards and Individual Liberties
  • CJ 304 Law and Evidence

Elective Courses (12 semester hours chosen from the following)

In addition to 9 semester hours of required courses, a student wishing to complete a minor in Legal Studies must complete twelve 12 hours from the following:

  • HIS/PLS 378 American Constitutional Development
  • BUS 225 Business Law I
  • BUS 226 Business Law II
  • CJ/PLS 420 Philosophy of Law
  • CJ/PLS 379 Judicial Process
  • CJ/SOC 410 Law and Society
  • CJ 460 Criminal Law/Criminal Procedure
  • ED 371 Educational Law
  • SED 467 Legal Issues and IFSP/IEP
  • GE 359 Ethics, Law, & Economics in Engineering Practice
  • LS 395 Special Topics in Legal Studies
  • LS 397 Directed Readings in Legal Studies

Pre-law

Faculty

Robert Hauhart

The pre-law curriculum at Saint Martin’s University consists of courses offered by a number of departments including political science, history, criminal justice and business. Many majors offer strong preparation for legal study. Pre-law students are encouraged to select courses that stress writing skills, critical thinking, and broad exposure to a challenging array of courses that reflects our American intellectual heritage.

Admission to law school is heavily influenced by the applicant’s University grade point average, score on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), rigorous nature of his or her academic program, and supporting documentation. As a consequence, students interested in pursuing a legal education are encouraged to select a rigorous course of study, maintain above-average academic standing, and develop strong relationships with faculty who challenge and develop their intellectual skills. Since the goals and background of students vary, each student is advised according to his or her individual educational plan, interest, and situation.

Social justice

Faculty

Robert Hauhart
David Price
Katya Shkurkin
Roger Snider

The Social Justice program offers an interdisciplinary minor that focuses on non-legal forms of justice, and the corresponding societal settings for injustice, in society. In addition to courses exclusively listed in Social Justice, select courses from Criminal Justice, Political Science, History, Sociology, Women’s Studies, and related areas contribute to the curriculum as electives. Students interested in acquainting themselves with the history, development, impact, and contemporary status of social justice initiatives may minor in Social Justice in support of their major field of study.

Minor in Social Justice (21 semester hours)

The minor requires completion of 9 required semester hours and 12 upper-division elective semester hours, drawn from the courses listed below.

Required Courses

  • SJ 110/SOC 110 Introduction to Social Justice
  • SOC 333 Women, Culture and Society
  • CJ 430/PLS 430 Constitutional Safeguards and Individual Liberties

Approved Elective Courses

Electives may include up to 6 semester hours of internship credit. Additional courses may be cross-listed for social justice credit on an occasional basis. Other elective courses may be counted toward the minor if, in the judgment of the program director, they significantly enhance the student’s learning in the program.

  • SJ 301 Social Justice in Literature
  • SJ 310 Social Justice in Film
  • RLS 305 Peaceable Kingdom
  • CJ/SOC/WS 307 Gender, Crime and Law
  • SOC 316 History of Women in North American Social Work: 1848-1945
  • HIS 319 United States Working Class History
  • SOC 370 Social Action
  • ENG 381 Women’s Literature
  • SJ 390 Internship
  • SJ 395 Special Topics
  • SJ 397 Directed Study

Social work

Faculty

Tam Dinh
Katya Shkurkin

The Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) program prepares students for entry level generalist practice in the field of social work. The interdisciplinary curriculum is designed to provide a broad theoretical base for students to draw from for social work practice. Its goals are to:

  • increase student knowledge of social work values and methods as an approach to intervening in human problems;
  • increase student practice competencies in providing social work services to a diverse population in diverse life situations;
  • encourage students to develop ethical and analytical thinking essential for professional social work;
  • increase students’ awareness of the broad profession of social work, including social welfare history, research, practice and graduate-level opportunities.

The social work major is offered only at the University’s Lacey campus.

Bachelor of Social Work

General Education Core (40-46 semester hours)

Major in Social Work (61 semester hours)

Lower-Division Courses (26 semester hours)

  • BIO121 Human Biology/Human Biology Lab
  • ECN 101 Introduction to Economics
  • MTH 201 Introduction to Statistics
  • PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology or PSY 205 Child and Adolescent Development
  • SOC 101 Modern Society and Culture or SOC 102 American Social Problems
  • SW 210 Introduction to Social Work
  • SW 240 Research Methods
  • SW 290 Introduction to Internship, taken concurrently with SW291 Internship Seminar

Upper-Division Courses (35 semester hours)

  • SW 301 Child Welfare
  • SW 303 Adulthood and Aging
  • SW 340 Interviewing
  • SW 344 Case Management and Advanced Interviewing
  • Choose one from: SOC 302 Sex, Race and Disability, SW 316 History of Women in American Social Work: 1848-1945, SOC 333 Women, Culture and Society, or SOC 396 Intercultural Communication
  • Choose one from: any upper-division PSY course
  • SW 390 Internship, taken concurrently with SW 391 Internship Seminar
  • SW 490 Advanced Internship, taken concurrently with SW 491 Advanced Internship Seminar
  • SW 498 Advanced Research Design
  • SW 499 Senior Seminar

NOTE: Before enrolling in an upper-division internship (SW 390), students must meet the following requirements:

  • Complete 12 semester hours of required major courses on the Lacey campus
  • Complete SW 210, SW 340, SW 344, SW 290 and SW 291 with a grade of “B” or better
  • Have an overall grade point average of at least 2.5

Internships may count for up to 27 semester hours toward graduation. A minimum of 12 semester hours of internships, which must include 3 semester hours of SW 290 and 9 semester hours divided between SW 390 and SW 490, are required. General Education semester hours may overlap with major requirements.

Sociology and cultural anthropology

Faculty

Robert Hauhart
Victor Kogan
David Price
Katya Shkurkin
Teresa Winstead

The Sociology and Cultural Anthropology Program is an interdisciplinary major designed to prepare students for work in a variety of fields, including sociological consulting, applied anthropology consulting, museum studies and a variety of service careers in both the public and private sector. Students in the program gain a broad-based education in critical reasoning and writing skills through the study of culture and society. The sociology and cultural anthropology major also serves the professional requirements of other departments by examining the impact of culture, ethnicity, race and stratification in contemporary society.

Bachelor of Arts

General Education Core (40-46 semester hours)

Major in Sociology/Cultural Anthropology (39 semester hours)

Lower-Division Courses

  • SOC 101 Modern Society and Culture
  • SOC 102 American Social Problems
  • SOC 103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
  • SOC 240 Research Methods

Upper-Division Courses (27 upper-division semester hours in sociology and cultural anthropology, including:)

  • SOC 318 History of Sociology and Anthropology
  • SOC 320 Social Psychology
  • SOC 350 Social Theory
  • SOC 450 Advanced Research for the Social Sciences
  • SOC 499 Sociology Seminar

Minor in Sociology/Cultural Anthropology (21 semester hours)

Lower-Division Courses

  • SOC 101 Modern Society and Culture
  • SOC 102 American Social Problems
  • SOC 240 Research Methods

Upper-Division Courses (12 semester hours of electives in sociology and cultural anthropology)

Catalog